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20121201
20121231
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turned out to bury mohammed hilal, to mourn the loss of a 22-year-old student who gave out polio vaccine in his spare time. but they also came to express public outrage at this week's murders. nine young people, six of them women, one just 17, have been gunned down since monday, and not at random. a series of coordinated assassinations targeting an annual three day polio vaccination campaign. >> ( translated ): we go out door to door and risk our lives to save innocent children from being permanently handicapped. for what? so that our coming generations turn out to be healthy. we work for our country and we are being rewarded in the form of death. what kind of justice is this? why are we targeted and killed? >> reporter: until someone claims responsibility, we won't know why. the taliban haven't come forward, but extreme islamist groups have long opposed western health interventions and the role for women in campaigns. frustration is compounded by the fact they were making such good progress. there were just 56 cases of polio in pakistan this year, the lowest ever. up until the 1950s, po
with opposition leader mohamed el-baradei. consider a sad day in my view for it is going to institutionalize -- >> ifill: the legal showdown between california health center that discusses marijuana and >> ifill: we have the story of a legal showdown between a california health center that dispenses marijuana and federal authorities. >> just people feel safe coming here. like going to your neighborhood cvs or anywhere else. >> brown: open season in congress look >> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and i
today the probe will focus on nobel peace laureate mohammed el-baradei, former foreign minister amr moussa and former presidential candidate hamdeen sabahi. all three oppose islamist president mohammed morsi and the country's new constitution. the new u.s. senator from hawaii democrat brian schatz was sworn in today. he'd been lieutenant governor for the last two years. now, he replaces fellow democrat daniel inouye, who died this month at the age of 88. schatz took the oath of office on the senate floor after being tapped by hawaii's governor. the new senator said he'll seek election in his own right, in 2014. inouye wanted hawaii congresswoman colleen hanabusa to take his seat. she said today she respects the governor's choice. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to margaret. >> warner: we turn now to russia, where a proposed new law on adoptions, causing alarm in the united states, came a step closer to being enacted today. ray suarez has the story. >> reporter: in moscow today, president vladimir putin said he does intend to sign a bill that bars americans from
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